Sugar Grove Church of the Brethren

Wardensville, WV

Photo of

Sugar Grove

when it was a

German Baptist

Brethren Church -

 

Taken

December 24, 1903

 

at

 

Church Council

And

Love Feast

 

Photo Supplied By:

Cecil Haycock

About Us

Description

    We are nestled in the valleys of Trout Run and  Thorne Bottom, West Virginia.  Our style is still old fashioned, but we embrace new technology.  Even with a congregation quite diverse in ideals  and theology, we  worship, learn and  work together for the greater good of the Kingdom of God through our  Lord Jesus Christ.  Anyone who is truly seeking to develop a closer relationship with God through Jesus Christ is welcome to our family.

History

    The Sugar Grove Church of the Brethren was started as a preaching point by the Flat Rock Church of the Brethren during the great evangelistic furor of the late 1800ís.  The preaching point became a part of the Woodstock Congregation and was served by various itinerant ministers traveling from Virginia.  John A. Deitz, George W. Heishman, H. N. Williams, John Glenn, Grant Glenn and William Jenkins contributed time and labor to build the Sugar Grove meeting house.  John Glenn and George W. Heishman were among the first ministers of this congregation.  Some members of the congregation found the meeting house too far from their homes, so in 1898 Samuel Heishman, Isaac Sager, Branson Sager, Noah Heishman, Harrison Heltzel, and Redis Heishman built the meeting house at Mt. Vernon which is located 12 miles south of Wardensville. 

    As the Woodstock Congregation reorganized into separate entities, the two West Virginia churches came to be known as the Trout Run Congregation.  In the 1960ís, attendance at the two preaching points became small enough that the two groups integrated into one congregation that continued to use both buildings.  Frank Deitz was the pastor for many years and worked tirelessly to keep the congregation strong.  In 2003, the name Sugar Grove Church of the Brethren was officially adopted after years of informal congregational use.

    Today the congregation continues to be an active and vital church working to serve God in the Trout Run Valley.